Chinese Medical Journal

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2017  |  Volume : 130  |  Issue : 20  |  Page : 2395--2401

Cesarean Section Rate in Singleton Primiparae and Related Factors in Beijing, China


Geng Song1, Yu-Mei Wei1, Wei-Wei Zhu2, Hui-Xia Yang1 
1 Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Peking University First Hospital, Beijing 10034, China
2 Exchange and Cooperation Division, National Institute of Hospital Administration, Beijing 100191, China

Correspondence Address:
Hui-Xia Yang
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Peking University First Hospital, No. 1 Xianmen Street, Xicheng District, Beijing 10034
China

Background: The cesarean section rate (CSR) has been a main concern worldwide. The present study aimed to investigate the CSR in Beijing, China, and to analyze the related factors of CS delivery. Methods: An observational study was conducted in 15 medical centers in Beijing using a systemic cluster sampling method. In total, 15,194 pregnancies were enrolled in the study between June 20, 2013 and November 30, 2013. Independent t-tests and Pearson's Chi-square test were used to examine differences between two groups, and related factors of the CSR were examined by multivariable logistic regression. Results: The CSR was 41.9% (4471/10,671) in singleton primiparae. Women who were more than 35 years old had a 7.4-fold increased risk of CS delivery compared with women <25 years old (odd ratio [OR] = 7.388, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 5.561–9.816, P < 0.001). Prepregnancy obese women had a 2-fold increased risk of CS delivery compared with prepregnancy normal weight women (OR = 2.058, 95% CI = 1.640–2.584, P < 0.001). The excessive weight gain group had a 1.4-fold increased risk of CS delivery compared with the adequate weight gain group (OR = 1.422, 95% CI = 1.289–1.568, P < 0.001). Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) women and DM women had an increased risk of CS delivery (1.2- and 1.7-fold, respectively) compared with normal blood glucose women. Women who were born in rural areas had a lower risk of CS delivery than did those who were born in urban areas (OR = 0.696, 95% CI = 0.625–0.775, P < 0.001). The risk of CS delivery gradually increased with a decreasing education level. Neonates weighing 3000–3499 g had the lowest CSR (36.2%). Neonates weighing <2500 g had a 2-fold increased risk of CS delivery compared with neonates weighing 3000–3499 g (OR = 2.020, 95% CI = 1.537–2.656, P < 0.001). Neonates weighing ≥4500 g had an 8.3-fold increased risk of CS delivery compared with neonates weighing 3000–3499 g (OR = 8.313, 95% CI = 4.436–15.579, P < 0.001). Conclusions: Maternal age, prepregnancy body mass index, gestational weight gain, blood glucose levels, residence, education level, and singleton fetal birth weight are all factors that might significantly affect the CSR.


How to cite this article:
Song G, Wei YM, Zhu WW, Yang HX. Cesarean Section Rate in Singleton Primiparae and Related Factors in Beijing, China.Chin Med J 2017;130:2395-2401


How to cite this URL:
Song G, Wei YM, Zhu WW, Yang HX. Cesarean Section Rate in Singleton Primiparae and Related Factors in Beijing, China. Chin Med J [serial online] 2017 [cited 2017 Dec 15 ];130:2395-2401
Available from: http://www.cmj.org/article.asp?issn=0366-6999;year=2017;volume=130;issue=20;spage=2395;epage=2401;aulast=Song;type=0